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Russell Sage Foundation: Initiative on Immigration and Immigrant Integration

Deadline: May 24, 2018
The Russell Sage Foundation/Carnegie Corporation Initiative on Immigration and Immigrant Integration seeks to support innovative research on the effects of race, citizenship, legal status and politics, political culture, and public policy on outcomes for immigrants and for the native-born of different racial and ethnic groups and generations.
The Foundation is especially interested in novel uses of under-utilized data and the development of new methods for analyzing these data. Proposals to conduct laboratory or field experiments, in-depth qualitative interviews, and ethnographies are also encouraged. Smaller projects might include exploratory fieldwork, a pilot study, or the analysis of existing data. Methodological variety and inter-disciplinary collaboration is encouraged. Proposals for comparative, cross-national work will be considered only if they have strong implications for U.S.-centered issues.
This initiative is also responsive to recent federal policy changes and emerging concerns about the resurgence of nativism and anti-immigrant sentiment –from executive orders limiting refugee resettlement to barring travel from some Muslim-majority countries.  And it invites examination of the extent to which social and political institutions reinforce (or prevent) the goals of immigrant progress and integration.
Examples of the kinds of topics and questions that are of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • Legal status: Legal status affects citizen children and spouses as well, with the effects varying with geography due to different state and local laws and institutions. To what extent does providing temporary legal status and work permits on the one hand (e.g., administrative relief in the form of deferred action) or increased enforcement on the other affect immigrant outcomes?  What is the impact of employer behavior and preferences on immigrant economic integration?  How do assumptions about the legal status of the foreign-born, and their variance by racial, religious and other factors, influence the attitudes and behaviors of the native-born?  How do legal status differences affect the extent and the pace of integration in terms of education, labor market or political outcomes? What are the implications of the criminalization of undocumented status (via intensified apprehension and deportation programs) for public safety, community cohesion, workplace health and safety, civic engagement, and for the socio-economic outcomes of children and youth?
  • Naturalization and citizenship: Why are naturalization rates so low and what factors explain who, among the eligible, naturalizes? To what extent does naturalization contribute to better social, political, and economic integration of immigrants?  What is the causal evidence on the long-term impacts of citizenship?
  • Mixed-ancestry, ethnic identity, and integration: A pan-ethnic label and identity (for example, African American, Latino/Hispanic, Asian American) includes many ethnicities, national origins, and languages for groups that differ greatly in their economic and social status. What determines the emergence of a pan-ethnic identity? Are pan-ethnics more likely than other immigrants to form marital unions outside their own racial or ethnic group? To what extent does having mixed-race (or mixed-ethnicity) parents affect the identities, inter-group attitudes, and the integration outcomes of these multi-racial children? To what extent does selective attrition through intermarriage lead higher achieving descendants of immigrants to stop identifying as ethnics or as members of a pan-ethnic group? To what extent are observed differences in integration outcomes due to different data sources (e.g., survey versus administrative data) and different measures of identity?
  • Race, religion, and inequality: To what extent are the pathways to integration of Latino immigrants affected by racial exclusion and/or by the large numbers of undocumented Latinos? To what extent do race and immigration status affect public opinion about various immigrant groups?  What are the effects of economic disparity between immigrants groups, and between immigrant groups and native minorities, on inter-group relations? Since 9/11, both Muslim immigrants and American-born Muslims have been the target of increased hostility and intolerance. What factors are associated with this antagonism and how does this affect our social and political institutions?
  • Politics, political culture, and public policy: To what extent does the treatment of immigrants by the various levels of government (i.e., signaling) affect levels of public support for immigrants and immigration policy? What is the effect of U.S. refugee resettlement policy on the economic integration of refugees and asylees in contrast to those of other immigrants? What is the long-term impact of initial conditions (a detention camp, a common location, or a dispersion policy) on integration outcomes for refugees and their dependents? What is the effect of immigrants’ experiences with government and the quality of the interaction on their attitudes towards government and government policies?
Amount: Grants are generally capped at $175,000, including 15% indirect costs. Projects that use publicly available data are capped at $75,000, including indirect costs.
Eligibility: All applicants (both PIs and Co-PIs) must have a Ph.D. or comparable terminal degree, or a strong career background that establishes their ability to conduct high-level, peer-reviewed scholarly research.
Link: http://www.russellsage.org/funding/immigration-and-immigrant-integration

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